Throughout the years, patients have been asking us a number of questions that have been coming up quite often. Here’s just a few of the more commonly asked ones, but if there’s a question here that we haven’t answered, please feel free to call us to find out more.

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Dental Questions, Columbus, OH Do you take emergency appointments?

Yes, we do accept emergency appointments for patients of record and see new patients as long as we can find time in our schedule.

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How white does bleaching get your teeth?

Bleaching with the new Third Generation Zoom! Advanced Power system will get teeth up to 8 shades brighter in 45 minutes. KöR teeth bleaching can make your teeth even whiter, but it takes longer. Porcelain veneers can also be used to make your teeth as white as you want them.

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How long has Dr. Firouzian been practicing dentistry?

Dr. Firouzian is a 1991 graduate of Ohio State and has been in the practice of dentistry since then.

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Do you accept my insurance?

We accept assignment of benefits for all PPO dental insurance plans. We are in network with a few, as well.

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How much pain will I have?

Very little if we can help it! We use the most modern and gentle approaches to dental treatment available. Our office is equipped with lasers and air abrasion, which allows us to perform fillings and soft tissue treatments involving the gum tissues without the use of anesthetic, thus allowing patients to experience less discomfort and quicker healing.
Before & After Reference 11
For our more anxious patients, we offer nitrous oxide, also known as “laughing gas.”

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Do you put patients to sleep?

We have “laughing gas” to help nervous patients become more relaxed in our office. We have on occasion prescribed a mild drug that relaxes a patient during their treatment; however, this requires someone to bring the patient to our office and take them home and usually we reserve this for the most anxious patients.

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Do you use digital X-rays?

Yes, our office is updated with the most advanced digital x-rays that allow very limited radiographic exposure to patients.

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Are you accepting new patients?

Of course. We value all patients new and old. We are grateful for all patients who place their trust in us. We are very proud of the great work our staff does. We have a strong professional staff that always treats all patients as they would like to be treated. The highest compliment to us is when we are referred a patient by a pleased patient.

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What is oral cancer?

Oral cancer accounts for about 3 percent of all cancers. It is treatable when detected early by your dentist. More than 90 percent of oral cancers are squamous cell cancers, which develop in the lining or covering of the mouth, lips, tongue, and throat.
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It can also be spread through the lymph nodes and into the neck.

The most common sign of oral cancer is a sore that does not heal and bleeds easily. A lump or thickening in the mouth or white patches which last longer than two weeks, difficulty in chewing or swallowing food and the inability to move the tongue freely can also be signs of oral cancer.

Dr. Firouzian can detect oral cancer during routine check-ups. The American Cancer Society recommends getting a dental exam every 6 to 12 months. Dental x-rays are the only way your dentist can see if tumors are present in your jaw and beneath the gum surface.

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What is cracked tooth syndrome?

Teeth may crack when subjected to the stress of chewing hard food or ice, or by biting on an unexpected hard object. Teeth with or without restorations may exhibit this problem, but teeth restored with typical silver-alloy restorations are most susceptible. A sign of a cracked tooth is pain while chewing, pain upon cold air application. If it is a “simple” crack, it can be treated by placement of a simple crown on the tooth. When the tooth is prepared for the crown, and a temporary restoration is placed, the pain usually leaves immediately. Occasionally, however, a crack is pronounced or severe enough to access the pulp, or nerve, of the tooth. The tooth may require root canal therapy before a crown is placed.

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